Volcano Eruption in Indonesia on November 21 2017 11:25 AM (UTC).
The volcano rumbling on in Bali has begun spewing out greyish-white plumes of ash again, continuing weeks-long period of activity. Mount Agung had calmed down in recent days and was emitting jets of steam, before Friday brought a return to the ash cloud. The ash was shot as high as 1.3 miles into the air, the Indonesian Disaster Mitigation Agency said. The 3,000-metre volcano, which is capable of very violent eruptions, has shown a marked increase in activity in the last few weeks, stoking fears of a repeat of an eruption in 1963 that killed more than 1,000 people.
The tower of ash rising up from Bali's erupting Mount Agung volcano has dissipated into a wisp of steam as many flights have resumed across the island. Most of Bali is said to be safe for tourists, but Indonesia's disaster mitigation agency said on Monday that the volcano remains at its highest alert level. The exclusion zone around the volcano still extends 10 kilometers from the crater and more than 55,000 people are living in shelters. Airlines Jetstar and Virgin Australia, which canceled flights over the weekend, resumed services on Monday. However, even after the ash cloud shrank dramatically, China's aviation authority suspended all flights from the holiday island until the volcanic ash cleared, according to reports.
An erupting volcano with a deadly history on Indonesia's island of Bali has spread drifting ash nearly five miles into the atmosphere and forced the island's international airport to close two days this week. Authorities have told 100,000 people to leave an area extending six miles from Mount Agung as it belches gray and white ash plumes. The volcano's last major eruption in 1963 killed about 1,100 people. It's unclear how bad the current eruption will get or how long it will last. Nearly 40,000 people are staying in 225 shelters, according to the Disaster Mitigation Agency in Karangasem. But tens of thousands of villagers have remained in their homes because they feel safe or don't want to abandon their farms. Flows of volcanic mud have been spotted on Agung's slopes, and more are possible because it's the rainy season, said Richard Arculus, a volcano expert at Australian National University. "They're not making a lot of noise. It's just suddenly coming like a flash flood," he said. ".?.?. You do not want to be near them."
An erupting volcano with a deadly history on Indonesia's island of Bali has spread drifting ash nearly five miles into the atmosphere and forced the island's international airport to close two days this week. Authorities have told 100,000 people to leave an area extending six miles from Mount Agung as it belches gray and white ash plumes. The volcano's last major eruption in 1963 killed about 1,100 people. It's unclear how bad the current eruption will get or how long it will last. Nearly 40,000 people are staying in 225 shelters, according to the Disaster Mitigation Agency in Karangasem. But tens of thousands of villagers have remained in their homes because they feel safe or don't want to abandon their farms. Flows of volcanic mud have been spotted on Agung's slopes, and more are possible because it's the rainy season, said Richard Arculus, a volcano expert at Australian National University. "They're not making a lot of noise. It's just suddenly coming like a flash flood," he said. ".?.?. You do not want to be near them."
Bali's Ngurah Rai airport will remain closed until at least Wednesday morning local time. "The Volcanic Ash Advisory shows that the plane routes have been covered by volcanic ash, this is dangerous for the flights," Indonesian AirNav official Wisnu Darjono said. Indonesia has warned the first major eruption of Mt Agung on the tourist island of Bali is imminent, with authorities closing the airport and ordering 100,000 residents living near the volcano to evacuate the area immediately. But thousands haven't left despite authorities raising the alert to its highest level, and forcible evictions may be enforced, a spokesman for the country's National Disaster Management Agency (BNPB) said. "There are personnel doing the sweeping, if they [residents] need to be forcibly evacuated," Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said. The airport was originally closed for 24 hours from Monday morning, disrupting 445 flights and stranding about 59,000 passengers, after Mount Agung sent volcanic ash high into the sky. Officials said cancellations could be extended. "Plumes of smoke are occasionally accompanied by explosive eruptions and the sound of weak blasts that can be heard up to 12km from the peak," the Disaster Mitigation Agency said in a statement after raising the alert from three to its highest level of four. "The potential for a larger eruption is imminent," it said, referring to a visible glow of magma at Mount Agung's peak overnight and warning residents to evacuate a danger zone at a radius of 8-10km. Video footage shared by the agency showed volcanic mud flows (lahar) on the mountainside. Lahar carrying mud and large boulders can destroy houses, bridges and roads in its path. Bali airport, about 60km from the volcano, will be closed for 24 hours, its operator said. Ten alternative airports have been prepared for airlines to divert inbound flights, including in neighbouring provinces. Virgin Australia said it was cancelling flights on Tuesday, while Jetstar was offering to exchange Bali bound tickets for other destinations.

Television footage showed hundreds of holidaymakers camped inside the airport terminal, some sleeping on their bags, others using mobile telephones. Some travellers had retired for the night on makeshift beds on the terminal's dusty floors. Others were considering a more than 10-hour journey across land to the city of Surabaya to begin a string of flights across Indonesia and eventually to Australia. But all were frustrated by the lack of information from the airlines. The first Janeen McKay heard of the cancellations was a text from her brother back in Australia just before she arrived at the airport. "I had nothing from Jetstar, they had my mobile number," she told AAP. She had been waiting for nearly 12 hours and was told by the airline she couldn't get home until Saturday. Ms McKay, an office manager, said she needed to get back to Geraldton to take care of her elderly mother, while her sister, Wendy Lynch, needed to be at work as a nurse on Thursday. "We had a really nice time in Bali but then we get here and this has just ruined it," Ms McKay said. "Why does it take five days to get us out of here? "Not very happy." Veronika Naberezhnova said she was resigned to the waiting game too. "It's a bit annoying," the Department of Human Services employee said. "My family's waiting there (in Sydney) as well, they're all waiting, they're all stressed." Cover-More, Australia's biggest travel insurer, said on its website customers would only be covered if they had bought policies before the volcano alert was first issued on September 18. Indonesia's hotel and restaurant association said stranded tourists at member hotels would get one night's free stay. Mt Agung sits more than 3000 metres high over eastern Bali. Australia's Bureau of Meteorology's Volanic Ash Advisory Centre in Darwin issued maps showing an ash cloud heading southeast over the neighbouring island of Lombok away from Bali's capital Denpasar, where the international airport is located.
The Indonesian disaster agency on Monday called on 100,000 to evacuate and expanded the danger zone after the eruption of Mount Agung. Authorities raised the alert to the highest level on Monday following the increased activity over the weekend. The move to close the airport came after tests showed the volcano's ash had reached its airspace, making it dangerous to fly. Hundreds of flights were cancelled, leaving about 59,000 tourists stranded on the Island. The closure will continue until Tuesday, but officials said they are closely monitoring the situation and will determine every six hours whether the airport should remain closed. "We now have to find a hotel and spend more of our money that they're not going to cover us for when we get home unfortunately," said Canadian tourist Brandon Olsen. Officials at the Disaster Mitigation Agency said in a statement Monday that a volcanic eruption is "imminent" though the exact scale remains unclear. "Continuing plumes of smoke are occasionally accompanied by explosive eruptions and the sound of weak blasts that can be heard up to 12 km (seven miles) from the peak," the statement read, according to Reuters. "Rays of fire are increasingly visible from night to the following day. This indicates the potential for a larger eruption is imminent," it added. In addition to the closure of the airport, officials warned residents around the volcano to evacuate immediately, creating a 6 mile exclusion zone around the crater.
Flights between Australia and Bali resumed on Sunday after eruptions from Bali's Mt Agung volcano grounded flights on Saturday, with ash descending on nearby villages. For the second time in a week, the volcano sent plumes of grey-black ash and steam at least 2000 metres into the sky prompting a number of airline to cancel services on Saturday. By Sunday morning, Qantas, Virgin and Jetstar announced that they were resuming flights to and from Bali, having decided that conditions had improved and it was safe to fly. The JQ43 from Melbourne to Bali's capital Denpasar departed from Tullamarine on schedule at 9.55am, while Royal Dutch Airlines and Garuda Airlines flights to Bali from Melbourne have also taken off. A Qantas flight from Sydney to Denpasar on Saturday night was diverted to Darwin, but a spokeswoman said the airline expected flights would operate to schedule on Sunday. A Virgin spokeswoman said delayed flights from Saturday would be flying to Bali on Sunday and that upcoming scheduled flights would be departing as planned. A spokesman for Denpasar International Airport Arie Ahsan said that while the airport was operating normally on Sunday, but it could close again. "It depends on the strength [of the eruption] and the wind direction," Mr Ahsan said. The current aviation code classification has been upgraded to red, meaning eruption is imminent or underway, with significant emission of ash into the atmosphere likely. On Saturday Jetstar Airways cancelled nine flights in and out of Bali's Denpasar Airport, from Sydney, Adelaide, Townsville, Perth, Singapore and Melbourne. Three Jetstar flights on Sunday have also been cancelled: from Bali to Townsville, Bali to Perth and Singapore to Bali. Flights operated by KLM, Qantas, AirAsia, and Virgin were also cancelled or re-routed on Saturday night following the eruption. The volcanic eruption comes as schoolies revellers embark on the second week of end-of-school celebrations in Kuta in Bali. A spokesman from Indonesia's Disaster Mitigation Agency said tourism in Bali remained safe, except in the area within a 6 to 7.5 kilometre radius of Mt Agung, which had continuously erupted from Saturday afternoon until Sunday morning. Around 25,000 people have already been evacuated from the slopes of Mt Agung to hundreds of refuge shelters. Locals reported facing heavy ash closer to the volcano. Wayan Dana, a volunteer from Rendang village, went to check on a village around 3 kilometres from the summit on Sunday morning, and found it empty and dense with ash. "It was raining ash everywhere...We used protection goggles, if not our eyes would hurt from the ashes," he said. In Muncan village, local Putu Budiari said there had been ash rain since Saturday night. "This morning, still until now all [is] still dark, you can't see the sun," said Ms Budiari. Mt Agung is just over 72 kilometres from Kuta, and towers over eastern Bali at a height of just over 3000m. When it last erupted in 1963 it killed more than 1000 people and razed several villages.
Indonesia's Mount Agung volcano in Bali has let out a puff of black smoke and ash in a small eruption, prompting Singapore to advise its citizens to be ready to evacuate the holiday island at short notice amid concern about a bigger eruption. Authorities have not changed the alert status on Agung, which remains at one level below the highest and there have been no reports of flight cancellations. "Singaporeans should defer non-essential travel to the affected areas of the island at this juncture," Singapore's Ministry of Foreign Affairs said in a travel notice on Wednesday. "You should also be ready to evacuate at short notice." Eruptions could result in ash clouds that could "severely disrupt air travel", it said. Agung looms menacingly over eastern Bali at a height of just over 3,000 meters (9,842 feet). It last erupted in 1963, killing more than 1,000 people and razing several villages. Indonesia has nearly 130 volcanoes, more than any other country. Many of them show high levels of activity but it can be months before an eruption. A spokesman for Indonesia's National Disaster Mitigation agency, said via a text message that there had been a "phreatic eruption" late on Tuesday with black smoke reaching 700 meters (2,300 ft), followed by falling ash, gravel and sand. "These types of eruptions - called phreatic - are the product of rock that already exists being shattered violently when water heated by the rising magma under Agung quickly turns to steam," according to a blog post on the Discovermagazine.com website. The disaster agency recommended against any activity within 6-7.5 km (3.7-4.6 miles) of the crater. It said that 29,245 people were staying in 278 evacuation camps. At one stage, after authorities put Agung's alert status at the highest level of four in September, more than 130,000 people left their homes. The alert level was lowered to three on Oct. 29. Australia left its travel advice unchanged and told citizens to "monitor local media reports, follow the instructions of local authorities, and stay outside the existing exclusion zone". Bali, famous for its surf, beaches and temples, attracted nearly 5 million visitors last year, but business has slumped in areas around the volcano since September when Agung's volcanic tremors began to increase. Tourism, a cornerstone of Bali's economy, is Indonesia's fourth-biggest earner of foreign currency after natural resources like coal and palm oil.
Dark, black smoke began billowing 700m above Mount Agung in Bali last night around 5pm local time, signalling that the volcano that has been under high alert since September had finally erupted. For the past two months, citizens residing within the danger zone of the volcano - approximately 6-7.5km within the tallest mountain peak in Indonesia's radius - have been put on high alert, with officials initially ordering more than 100,000 from their homes. After months of these warnings from the country's national disaster agency, Mount Agung, which hasn't seen an eruption in more than half a century, finally gave way to what officials are calling a 'small eruption'. In a statement to the ABC, the head of volcano monitoring at Mount Angung, I Dewa Made Mertayasa, said that the kind of eruption witnessed at the volcano is what would be classified as a 'phreatic explosion' and that there was no need for people outside of the immediate danger zone to start evacuating. "Phreatic means that the water in the crater surface collected because of heavy rain recently combined with ascending magma," said Mertasaya. The nation's alert level was first raised in late September to the maximum threat level of four, after which thousands of people left their homes to live in emergency centres. It was later dropped to level three, which it remains to be resting at, even after last night's small eruption. Though this initial eruption at Mount Agung is one that consists of only steam, officials are continuing to monitor the situation closely on the off chance that the magma brimming beneath the mountaintop decides to surface. National Disaster Mitigation Agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said after the volcano's eruption in a statement to ABC News that they will continue to monitor the volcano's seismic tremors, but that there hadn't been an increase in activity since the spewing at Mount Agung began on Tuesday evening. If there were to be an increase in seismic activity, he added, it would indicate that there was magma rising in the mountain and the potential for another eruption would increase. Part of the reason for this added caution being exercised by both government officials and people living close to the Balinese mountain is that they wouldn't want to see happen again what occurred the last time Mount Agung erupted. In 1963, 1,600 people died from the volcano's eruption, with many dying from being burned alive by fast-moving waves of super heated gas that plumed over the mountain's side, called 'pyroclastic flows'. As a measure of caution, there are about 30,000 people from the original evacuation order issued back in September that remain in emergency centres.