Tropical Storm in Japan on September 30 2018 05:05 AM (UTC).
A powerful typhoon tore through Japan on Sunday and early Monday morning, leaving at least two people dead and injuring more than 120 as well as wreaking havoc on transportation systems. According to the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), Typhoon Trami first made landfall last night and carved a path through western Japan and eastern and northern parts of Honshu including the wider Tokyo area. Local media said of the fatalities known so far, a truck driver was killed by a landslide in Tottori prefecture, western Japan. Another was confirmed dead in Yamanashi prefecture, west of Tokyo, after being found in a river. A woman in her 60s has also been reported missing after being washed away by an irrigation ditch in Miyazaki prefecture, southwestern Japan. Public transport across the nation has been severely disrupted, with delays in Tokyo on Monday morning casing disruption as trains and power lines were checked. East Japan Railway Co. canceled all of its train services in the Tokyo Metropolitan area at around 8 p.m. (local time) on Sunday. According to the company, such measures, that involved alerting the public beforehand about the closure, were unprecedented. Central Japan Railway Co. meanwhile, suspended all Shinkansen bullet trains services on the Tokaido Shinkansen Line between Tokyo and Shin-Osaka after 5 p.m. Sunday. The services were resumed around 7:30 a.m. Monday however, the operator said. Shinkansen trains between Shin-Osaka and Hiroshima were halted as were numerous local rail services. Kansai International Airport in Osaka, already battered by a typhoon in September, was closed and will be reopened on Monday, the airport's operator said. Major airline including Japan Airlines (JAL) and All Nippon Airways (ANA) will likely cancel more than 180 flights on Monday because huge cancellations of flights a day earlier have left them short of aircraft. The typhoon knocked out power at 450,000 households in Tokyo and its surrounding areas early Monday morning, local reports said. The season's 24th typhoon, as of 8 a.m. local time on Monday, was moving on a northeasterly trajectory and was located around 120 km towards the south of Hokkaido's Cape Erimo, the weather agency said. The typhoon is traveling at a speed of around 95 km with an atmospheric pressure of 970 hectopascals at its center and packing winds of up to 180 kph, the agency said.
A powerful typhoon hurtled toward Japan's mainland Sunday after injuring dozens on southern islands, as weather officials warned that fierce winds and torrential rain could trigger landslides and floods. Typhoon Trami has already disrupted travel in the world's third-biggest economy, with bullet train services in the west of Japan suspended, more than 1,000 flights cancelled due to the closure of a key airport and Tokyo's evening train services scrapped. The storm is forecast to smash into the mainland near the city of Osaka shortly after 6 p.m. and churn across the Japanese archipelago, likely hitting areas still recovering from extreme weather that has battered Japan in recent months. Trami tore through the southern island of Okinawa on Saturday, bringing winds strong enough to flip over cars. Several houses were flooded or damaged and 46 people on the island sustained minor injuries but no one was feared dead, local officials said. Nationwide, authorities have issued non-compulsory evacuation advisories to 1.5 million residents, according to public broadcaster NHK. Nearly 500,000 households in Kyushu and Okinawa have lost power, local utilities said. As the typhoon barreled east, rail authorities took the highly unusual step of cancelling evening train services in Tokyo, one of the world's busiest networks, urging passengers to shelter indoors when the storm hits. The typhoon is not expected to hit the capital head-on but strong winds and heavy rain are still feared from later Sunday. Some businesses were already putting up shutters and hunkering down. Trami is the latest in a string of extreme natural events in Japan, which has suffered typhoons, flooding, earthquakes and heatwaves in recent months, claiming scores of lives and causing extensive damage. Packing maximum gusts of 216 kilometers (134 miles) per hour, Trami was expected to travel over most of the archipelago, weakening slightly but causing extreme weather into Monday, forecasters said. Still classed as a "very strong" typhoon, Trami pounded Kagoshima on the western tip of Japan early Sunday, causing 10 minor injuries -- such as cuts from broken windows and people knocked over by gusts. "We are strongly urging our residents to stay indoors because it is extremely dangerous to be outside now," Masaaki Tamaki, an official of Kagoshima's disaster management section, told AFP.
A powerful typhoon hurtled toward Japan's mainland Sunday after injuring dozens on southern islands, as weather officials warned that fierce winds and torrential rain could trigger landslides and floods. Typhoon Trami has already sparked travel disruption in the world's third-biggest economy, with bullet train services in the west of Japan suspended and almost 1,000 flights canceled due to the closure of a key airport hub. Television footage showed cars in Okinawa island flipped over by the strength of the wind. Several houses were flooded or damaged and 38 people sustained minor injuries but no one was feared dead, local officials said. Authorities issued evacuation advisories to some 349,000 residents, while electricity was cut to more than 300,000 houses, according to public broadcaster NHK. Trami is the latest in a series of extreme natural events in Japan, which has suffered typhoons, flooding, earthquakes and heat waves in recent months, claiming scores of lives and causing extensive damage. Packing maximum gusts of 216 kilometers (134 miles) per hour near its center, Trami was forecast to hit the mainland later Sunday and travel over most of the archipelago, causing extreme weather into Monday, forecasters said. Maintaining its "very strong force," the storm churned near Kagoshima on the western tip of Japan, causing seven minor injuries. "We are strongly urging our residents to stay indoors because it is extremely dangerous to be outside now," Masaaki Tamaki, an official of Kagoshima's disaster management section, told AFP. The Japanese meteorological agency issued a special warning of landslides and floods in Kagoshima and Chiba, while saying heavy rain seen once in half a century has been monitored in Yakushima island, southern Kagoshima. Strong winds and downpours could trigger landslides and floods as well as lightning strikes and tornados across the nation, said the agency, warning that waves and wind could reach record levels.