Earthquake in Indonesia on August 05 2018 03:23 PM (UTC).
The Indonesian island of Lombok was shaken by a third big earthquake in little more than a week Thursday as the official death toll from an earlier quake topped 300. The strong aftershock, measured at magnitude 5.9 by the U.S. Geological Survey, caused panic, damage to buildings, landslides and injuries. It was centered in the northwest of the island and didn't have the potential to cause a tsunami, Indonesia's geological agency said. Videos showed rubble strewn across streets and clouds of dust enveloping buildings. In northern Lombok, some people leaped from their vehicles on a traffic jammed road while an elderly woman standing in the back of a pickup truck wailed "God is Great." An Associated Press reporter in the provincial capital Mataram saw people injured by the tremor and a hospital moved patients outside. The aftershock had caused more "trauma," said national disaster agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho. Wiranto, Indonesia's top security minister, told reporters the death toll from Sunday's magnitude 7.0 quake had risen to 319. The announcement came after an inter-agency meeting was called to resolve wildly different figures from different agencies. Grieving relatives were burying their dead and medics tended to people whose broken limbs hadn't yet been treated in the day since the quake. The Red Cross said it was focusing relief efforts on an estimated 20,000 people yet to get any assistance. In Kopang Daya village in the hard-hit Tanjung district of north Lombok, a distraught family was burying their 13-year-old daughter who was struck by a collapsing wall and then trampled when the quake Sunday caused a stampede at her Islamic boarding school. Villagers and relatives prayed outside a tent where the girl's body lay inside covered in a white cloth. "She was praying when the earthquake happened," said her uncle Tarna, who gave a single name. "She was trying to get out, but she got hit by a wall and fell down. Children were running out from the building in panic and she was stepped on by her friends," he said.Thousands of homes were damaged or destroyed in Sunday's quake and more than 150,000 people are homeless. The earlier earthquakes also left cracks in walls and roofs, making the weakened buildings susceptible to collapse. "People are always saying they need water and tarps," said Indonesian Red Cross spokesman Arifin Hadi. He said the agency has sent 20 water trucks to five remote areas, including one village of about 1,200 households. He also said they're continuing to look for people with untreated injuries. In Kopang Daya, injured villagers got their first proper treatment Thursday after medics arrived with a portable X-ray and other supplies. They tended to an elderly woman with an injured face and hips who'd been knocked over by her grandson as they scrambled from their house. "Her son managed to get out from the house when the earthquake hit but the grandmother and grandson were left behind," said a relative Nani Wijayanti. "The grandson tried to help the grandmother to get out but he pushed too hard," she said. A July 29 quake on Lombok killed 16 people. Indonesia is prone to earthquakes because of its location on the "Ring of Fire," an arc of volcanoes and fault lines in the Pacific Basin. In December 2004, a massive magnitude 9.1 earthquake off Sumatra triggered a tsunami that killed 230,000 people in a dozen countries.
Indonesia on Monday (Aug 6) sent rescuers fanning out across the holiday island of Lombok and evacuated more than 2,000 tourists after a powerful earthquake killed at least 98 people and damaged thousands of buildings. The shallow 6.9-magnitude quake sparked terror among tourists and locals alike, coming just a week after another deadly tremor surged through Lombok and killed 17 people. Rescuers used diggers and heavy machinery to clear debris and search for survivors on Monday. The National Disaster Mitigation Agency (BNPB) said it expected the death toll to rise once the rubble of more than 13,000 flattened and damaged houses was cleared away. Power and communications were severed in some areas, with landslides and a collapsed bridge blocking access to areas around the quake epicentre in the north - forcing rescue teams to bring in the heavy machinery. The military said it would send a ship with medical aid, supplies and logistics support. National disaster agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said there were fears a number of people were trapped in the ruins of a collapsed mosque in the northern village of Lading-Lading. Footage he posted on Twitter showed the large concrete mosque had pancaked. Shattered roads were hampering efforts to reach survivors in the mountainous north and east of the island, which had been hardest hit. Najmul Akhyar, the head of North Lombok district, estimated that 80 per cent of that region was damaged by the quake. "We expect the number of fatalities to keep rising," Nugroho said. "All victims who died are Indonesians." He said up to 20,000 people may have had to quit their homes on Lombok and paramedics, food and medication were badly needed. The spokesman said search and rescue teams also rescued between 2,000 and 2,700 tourists from the Gili Islands, three tiny, coral-fringed tropical islands a few kilometres off the northwest coast of Lombok. Michelle Thompson, an American holidaying on one of the Gilis, described a "scramble" to get on boats leaving for the main island during which her husband was injured. "People were just throwing their suitcases on board and I had to struggle to get my husband on, because he was bleeding," she said. Footage posted online by Nugroho showed hundreds crowded onto powder-white beaches desperately awaiting transport off the normally paradise Gilis. "We cannot evacuate all of them all at once because we don't have enough capacity on the boats," Muhammad Faozal, the head of the tourism agency in West Nusa Tenggara province, told AFP, adding two navy vessels were on their way. "It's understandable they want to leave the Gilis, they are panicking." By early afternoon, hundreds of weary tourists had arrived with their baggage at Bangsal harbour, the main link between Lombok and the Gilis. Margret Helgadottir, a holidaymaker from Iceland, described people screaming as the roof of her hotel on one of the islands collapsed. "We just froze: thankfully we were outside," she told AFP tearfully from a harbour in Lombok to where she had been evacuated. "Everything went black, it was terrible." Seven Indonesian holidaymakers died on the largest of the three islands, Gili Trawangan, while another local woman died on nearby Bali. But it was Lombok which bore the brunt of Sunday evening's quake. The shallow tremor sent thousands of residents and tourists scrambling outdoors, where many spent the night as strong aftershocks including one of 5.3-magnitude rattled the island. The Indonesian Agency for Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics (BMKG) said more than 120 aftershocks were recorded after Sunday evening's quake. The quake knocked out power in many areas and parts of Lombok remained without electricity on Monday. Hundreds of bloodied and bandaged victims were treated outside damaged hospitals in the main city of Mataram and other hard-hit areas. Patients lay on beds under wards set up in tents, surrounded by drip stands and monitors, as doctors in blue scrubs attended to them.
A powerful earthquake struck the Indonesian tourist island of Lombok on Sunday, killing at least 82 people and shaking neighboring Bali, one week after another quake killed more than a dozen on the island. The latest quake, which triggered a brief tsunami warning, damaged buildings as far away as Denpasar on Bali, including a department store and the airport terminal, where ceiling panels were shaken loose, authorities said. Video showed screaming people running in panic from houses in a Bali neighborhood and vehicles rocking. On Lombok, soldiers and other rescuers carried injured people on stretchers and carpets to an evacuation center. The quake, recorded at magnitude 7.0 by the U.S. Geological Survey, struck early Sunday evening at a depth of 6 miles in the northern part of Lombok. National Disaster Mitigation Agency spokesperson Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said the toll had risen 82 with hundreds others were injured. Earlier officials said at least 39 people had died. A total of 65 of the deaths in North Lombok district, nine in West Lombok district, four in the provincial capital Mataram and two each in Central Lombok and East Lombok districts, Nugroho said. Thousands of houses were damaged, and most of the dead victims were hit by collapsed houses, he said. Chrissy Teigen, along with her husband John Legend and their two children, felt the quake during their vacation in Bali. Teigen live-tweeted what she and her family experienced Sunday. A tsunami warning was lifted after waves just 6 inches high were recorded in three villages, said Dwikorita Karnawati, the head of Indonesia's Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics Agency. The quake was felt strongly across Lombok and Bali and had damaged houses on both islands, Nugroho said. "I was watching TV when I felt a big shake," said Harian, a Lombok woman who uses one name. "The lamp was shaking, and people were shouting 'Get out.' I ran out into the dark because the power cut off." Frightened people poured out of their homes to move to higher ground, particularly in North Lombok and Mataram, the capital of West Nusa Tenggara province, said Iwan Asmara, a Lombok disaster official. The Bali and Lombok airports continued operating Sunday night, according to the director general of civil aviation. There had been a half-hour evacuation at the Lombok airport following the quake because the electricity went off. TV showed crying women consoling each other outside Lombok's airport.
A powerful magnitude 7 earthquake on Sunday struck the Indonesian island of Lombok, killing at least 19 people and triggering tsunami warning. The tremor came just a week after another quake killed 17 people on the island and prompted people to flee from their homes to higher land. It was also felt on the neighbouring resort island of Bali. The earthquake struck just 10km underground, according to the US Geological Survey, and was followed by two aftershocks. A tsunami warning was issued but later lifted. Lombok is a popular tourist destination, drawing in visitors with surfing, beaches and hiking trails. The earthquake of last week triggered landslides that briefly trapped trekkers on popular mountain hiking routes. Najmul Akhyar, district chief of North Lombok, told local media that he was unable to assess the entire situation due to an electrical blackout. Television host and celebrity tweeter Chrissy Teigen was on the nearby island of Bali with her husband John Legend, the singer, and their two young children as the earthquake struck. Ms Teigen tweeted: "Bali. Trembling. So long." She added: "Oh man. We are on stilts. It felt like a ride." Dwikorita Karnawati, head of the agency for meteorology, climatology and geophysics advised people not to panic. "Please go to a place with higher ground, while remaining calm." Ms Karnawati added that small waves just 15cm (6 inches) high had been reported in three villages. A nearby volcano was evacuated after the earthquake struck. Many buildings were thought to have been damaged in Lombok's main city of Mataram, mostly those made from weak construction materials, according to Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, spokesman for Indonesia's disaster mitigation agency. Indonesia straddles the so-called Pacific "Ring of Fire", where tectonic plates collide, making the nation one of the most disaster prone in the world. Some 90 per cent of the world's earthquakes happen in this region. Other countries including Bolivia, Chile, Japan, and the US west coast also sit on the "Ring of Fire."