Epidemic in Iran on February 29 2020 11:35 AM (UTC).
Iran's death toll from the new coronavirus rose on Friday to 3,294 as it killed another 134 people in the past 24 hours, according to Health Ministry Spokesman Kianoush Jahanpur.The total number of people confirmed to be infected is 53,183, he said on state television, adding that 4,035 ware "under observation", a term that may mean they are in critical condition.Of the total number of people who were diagnosed with the disease, 17,935 have recovered, he said.Iran is the country most affected in the Middle East by the pandemic.
Iran's death toll from the coronavirus has reached 3,136, with 124 deaths in the past 24 hours, Health Ministry spokesman Kianush Jahanpur told state TV on Thursday, adding that the country had 50,468 cases of infection."We have 3,956 infected people in critical condition ... There was 2,875 new cases of infected people in the past 24 hours... 16,711 people have recovered from the disease," Jahanpur said.
The death toll from alcohol poisoning in Iran has risen to 300 after people started to consume methanol because of a rumour that high proof alcohol could cure the coronavirus. Iranian media reports that more than 1,000 have been sickened so far by ingesting methanol across the Islamic Republic, where drinking alcohol is banned and where those who do rely on bootleggers. According to MailOnline, it comes as Tehran announced 144 new deaths from coronavirus on Friday, bringing its death toll to 2,378, and another 2,926 new confirmed cases, with a total of more than 32,300 infected. There have been a spate of fake remedies spreading across social media in Iran, where people remain deeply suspicious of the government after it downplayed the crisis for days before it overwhelmed the country. Dr. Knut Erik Hovda, a clinical toxicologist in Oslo who studies methanol poisoning and fears Iran's outbreak could be even worse than reported, said: 'The virus is spreading and people are just dying off, and I think they are even less aware of the fact that there are other dangers around.' 'When they keep drinking this, there's going to be more people poisoned.' Iran as been particularly badly hit by the coronavirus pandemic, which is home to 80 million people. As of now, there is no known cure for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus. Scientists and doctors continue to study the virus and search for effective medicines and a vaccine. Meanwhile, Vanguard reported that some residents of Kwara State now use hand sanitisers as mouthwash and to rub on their bodies as prevention against COVID-19 infection. ALSO READ: Methanol Fuel Policy wilI end gas flaring, boost economy - Onu On the Iran incident, in messages forwarded and forwarded again, Iranian social media accounts in Farsi falsely suggested a British school teacher and others cured themselves of the coronavirus with whiskey and honey, based on a tabloid story from early February. Mixed with messages about the use of alcohol-based hand sanitizers, some wrongly believed drinking high-proof alcohol would kill the virus in their bodies. The Islamic Republic has reported over 29,000 confirmed cases and more than 2,200 deaths from the virus, the highest toll of any country in the Middle East. International experts also fear Iran may be under-reporting its cases, as officials for days played down the virus ahead of a parliamentary election. That fear of the virus, coupled with poor education and internet rumors, saw dozens sickened by drinking bootleg alcohol containing methanol in Iran's southwestern Khuzestan province and its southern city of Shiraz. Videos aired by Iranian media showed patients with IVs stuck in their arms, laying on beds otherwise needed for the fight against the coronavirus, including an intubated 5-year-old boy who had been turned blind from the alcohol poisoning. Iranian media also reported cases in the cities of Karaj and Yazd. The government mandates that manufacturers of toxic methanol add an artificial color to their products so the public can tell it apart from ethanol, the kind of alcohol that can be used in cleaning wounds. Content and use of methanol Ethanol is also the kind of alcohol found in alcoholic beverages, though its production is illegal in Iran. Some bootleggers in Iran use methanol, adding a splash of bleach to mask the added color before selling it as drinkable. Sometimes it is mixed with consumable alcohol to stretch supply, other times it comes as methanol, falsely advertised as drinkable. Methanol also can contaminate traditionally fermented alcohol. Methanol cannot be smelled or tasted in drinks. It causes delayed organ and brain damage. Symptoms include chest pain, nausea, hyperventilation, blindness and even coma. Dr. Javad Amini Saman said: 'It is rumored that alcohol can wash and sanitize the digestive system.' 'That is very wrong.' Even before the outbreak, methanol poisoning had taken a toll in Iran. One academic study found methanol poisoning sickened 768 people in Iran between September and October 2018 alone, killing 76. Other Muslim nations that ban their citizens from drinking also see such methanol poisoning, although Iran appears to be the only one in the pandemic so far to turn toward it as a fake cure. In Buddhist Cambodia, police said they seized 4,200 liters (1,100 gallons) of methanol from a man who unwittingly planned to make toxic hand sanitizer because of the virus outbreak. Muslim drinkers in Iran can be punished with cash fines and 80 lashes. However, minority Christians, Jews and Zoroastrians can drink alcoholic beverages in private. While police occasionally announce alcohol busts, the trade in nontoxic alcohol also continues. Locally made Iranian arak from fermented raisins, known as Aragh sagi, sells for $10 for a 1.5-liter bottle. Imported vodka sells for $40 a bottle. Rafik, an Iranian-Armenian who makes vodka in the basement of his Tehran home said: 'Every year during Nowruz, or the Persian New Year holidays that begin March 21, my customers double.' He spoke on the condition that only his first name be used for fear of arrest. 'This year, because of corona, it jumped up by four- or five-fold.' Farhad, a self-described heavy drinker who lives in central Tehran, said alcohol remains easy to find for those looking for it. 'Even you can find it offered when you are walking down the street, ' he said. Since 1979, Iran's 40 alcohol factories have seen their production changed to pharmaceutical needs and sanitizers. Others had been left idle, like the abandoned Shams alcohol factory east of Tehran. But now, in a time when even some mosques in Iran hand out high-proof alcohol as a sanitizer, officials plan to start work again at Shams to produce 22,000 liters of 99 per cent alcohol a day.

Iran's death toll from the coronavirus pandemic rose to 2,378 on Friday, with 144 people dying in the past 24 hours, Health Ministry spokesman Kianoush Jahanpour said. The total number of confirmed cases of the disease increased by 2,926 to 32,332, he told state TV, adding that 2,893 of the patients are in a critical condition.
Iran on Monday announced 127 new deaths from the novel coronavirus, raising the official toll to 1,812 in one of the worst-hit countries along with Italy, Spain and China.Health ministry spokesman Kianouche Jahanpour said 1,411 new cases had been recorded in Iran over the past 24 hours, bringing the total of those infected to 23,049.Jahanpour, who was speaking during his daily news conference devoted to the pandemic, said he would no longer give a breakdown of cases by province.This was necessary, he said, to avoid sparking undue concern among residents of the most stricken areas and ensure that those in less affected zones remained cautious.All of Iran's 31 provinces have been hit by the novel coronavirus outbreak.Tolls provided by the health ministry in recent days indicated that the spread of the virus has worsened especially in the northern and central regions of Iran.Jahanpour renewed a call by authorities for people to stay at home until "the virus is conquered".
That call has come as the Islamic republic is celebrating the Iranian New Year, a time when people usually travel far and wide across the country for holidays and family reunions.Authorities, however, have not imposed any travel ban or lockdown on Iran where the Nowruz holiday continues until April 3.On Sunday the supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, urged Iranians to follow state instructions "so that Almighty God will put an end to this calamity for the Iranian people, for all Muslim nations and for all mankind".
Iran announces 149 more fatalities from virus, bringing death toll to 1,433 amid nearly 20,000 confirmed cases.
Iran announced on Sunday that the new coronavirus has killed 113 more people, the highest single-day death toll yet in one of the world's worst-affected countries.People "should cancel all travel and stay at home so that we may see the situation improving in the coming days," health ministry spokesman Kianoush Jahanpour said in a televised conference."In the past 24 hours, 1,209 new cases have been confirmed... with 113 deaths in the past 24 hours, the death toll has reached 724," Alireza Vahabzadeh, an adviser to Iran's health minister, tweeted.Iran's official leading the country's response to the worst coronavirus outbreak in the Middle East on Sunday acknowledged that the pandemic could overwhelm health facilities in Iran, which is under severe US sanctions.Iran is battling one of the worst outbreaks outside China, with nearly 13,000 confirmed cases and more than 700 fatalities. The real number of infections could be even higher, as questions have been raised about the government's transparency.
"If the trend continues, there will not be enough capacity," Ali Reza Zali, who is leading the campaign against the outbreak, was quoted as saying by the state-run IRNA news agency.
Iranian state TV said Saturday the new coronavirus outbreak has killed another 97 people, pushing the death toll in the country to 611 amid 12,729 confirmed cases. Iran is suffering from the worst outbreak in the Middle East. The virus has also infected a number of senior officials there. Saudi Arabia earlier said it would halt all international flights to the kingdom for two weeks in the latest effort to contain the spread of the new virus. Gulf nations have been scrambling to contain the pandemic, which has spread to more than 100 countries and infected more than 130,000 people. Of special concern is nearby Iran. For most people, the new coronavirus causes only mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia.The vast majority of people recover from the new virus in a matter of weeks, but the outbreak has caused more than 5,000 deaths worldwide. The state-run Saudi Press Agency, quoting an unnamed Interior Ministry official, said flights would be cancelled starting Sunday. In the United Arab Emirates, health officials ordered the elderly to stay home because of the coronavirus outbreak and authorities said some federal employees could begin working from home for two weeks starting Sunday. Abu Dhabi's The National newspaper reported that nightclubs and tourist restaurants in the emirate will be shut down until the end of March. The Department of Culture and Tourism also suspended all planned events, including concerts, in Abu Dhabi. The decision does not extend to Dubai. A number of major sporting events, conferences, and other gatherings have been cancelled across the globe. The virus is highly contagious, and even those showing no symptoms can spread it, making large public gatherings particularly risky.

Iran announced on Friday that the new coronavirus has claimed another 85 lives, the highest single-day death toll in one of the world's worst affected countries."Sadly, 85 people infected with the COVID-19 disease have died in the past 24 hours", bringing to 514 the overall number of deaths in Iran, health ministry spokesman Kianoush Jahanpour said in a televised news conference."Across the country, at least 1,289 infected people have been added to the list of confirmed patients," said Jahanpour."The total number of patients has therefore reached 11,364 cases," he said, adding Tehran province had the most new infections.The outbreak in Iran is one of the deadliest outside China, where the disease originated.Several politicians and officials both sitting and former, have been infected, with some dying from the illness.The latest suspected case of infection was Ali Akbar Velayati, who advises Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei on foreign policy.Velayati fell ill with "mild symptoms" on Wednesday and has been placed in quarantine, according to Tasnim news agency.
Iran has been scrambling to contain the spread of the COVID-19 illness which has hit all of the country's 31 provinces, killing 237 people and infecting 7,161.
The death toll from the coronavirus outbreak in Iran rose to 194 on Sunday, the country's Health Ministry has announced.Authorities said 49 people died in the last 24 hours, while 743 new cases were found, pushing up the total number of confirmed cases to 6,566, spokesman Kianoush Jahanpour told a news conference in the capital Tehran.At least 22,177 people are currently under medical care, while the number of discharged patients stands at 55,404, he said.Turkey - where there are no confirmed cases of coronavirus - last month closed its land borders and suspended air travel to Iran.
Besides China, Italy, and South Korea, Iran is the worst-affected country since the outbreak of the disease last December.
As part of its efforts to contain the virus, Tehran has taken several measures, including the closure of all schools and institutions of higher education, calling off sports events, and banning government officials from leaving the country.First detected in Wuhan, China in December, the virus, officially known as COVID-19, has spread to more than 80 countries.The global death toll is nearly 3,500, and over 100,000 confirmed cases, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).As part of efforts to contain the outbreak, governments have closed borders and suspended land and air travel with the worst-hit countries.After declaring the outbreak an international health emergency in January, last month the WHO updated the global risk level to "very high."
Iran said Friday the new coronavirus has killed 124 people amid 4,747 confirmed cases in the Islamic Republic as authorities warned they may use "force" to limit travel between cities.Health Ministry spokesman Kianoush Jahanpour offered the figures at a televised news conference. He did not elaborate on the threat to use force, though he acknowledged the virus now was in all of Iran's 31 provinces.Iran cancelled Friday prayers across its major cities. Elsewhere in the region, Iraq cancelled Friday prayers in Karbala, where a weekly sermon is delivered on behalf of the country's top Shiite cleric. Authorities in the United Arab Emirates meanwhile limited prayers to two verses of the Qur'an so they lasted no longer than 10 minutes, over concerns about the virus.More than 4,990 cases of the virus, which causes the illness COVID-19, have been confirmed across the Middle East. Iran and Italy have the world's highest death tolls outside of China.Iran on Thursday announced it would put checkpoints in place to limit travel between major cities, hoping to stem the spread of the virus. Semiofficial media in Iran showed images of cars backed up on the highway as the checkpoints took effect.In Tehran, firefighters sprayed disinfectant on an 18-kilometre (11-mile) length of Tehran's famous Valiasr Avenue, some from firetrucks and others walking along its sidewalks, spraying ATMs and storefronts."It would be great if they did it every day," grocery store owner Reza Razaienejad said after the firefighters sprayed outside his shop. "It should not be just a one-time thing and should be done frequently, especially in places like here where movement and traffic happens a lot."But Iran offered some hope as well. Authorities reported a woman infected with the virus gave birth to a girl late Thursday night in Qom, the Shiite holy city particularly hard-hit by the virus.
Iranian state television says Friday prayers have been canceled across all provincial capitals amid the country's growing coronavirus outbreak.The report Wednesday comes as Tehran and other areas canceled Friday prayers last week over the outbreak.Iran earlier announced that the new coronavirus has killed 92 people amid 2,922 confirmed cases across the Islamic Republic, the highest death toll in the world outside of China.Iran said Wednesday that the new coronavirus has killed 92 people amid 2,922 confirmed cases across the Islamic Republic, the highest death toll in the world outside of China.Health Ministry spokesman Kianoush Jahanpour announced the new figures at a news conference in Tehran, raising Iran's death toll from the new illness to higher than Italy's, where there has also been a serious spike in infections.There are now over 3,140 cases of the new virus across the Mideast. Of those outside Iran in the region, most link back to the Islamic Republic.The virus has sickened top leaders inside Iran's civilian government and Shiite theocracy. Iran stands alone in how the virus has affected its government, even compared to hard-hit China, the epicenter of the outbreak. Worldwide, the virus has infected more than 90,000 people and caused over 3,100 deaths.Experts worry Iran may be underreporting the number of cases it has."The virus has no wings to fly," Jahanpour said. "We are the ones who transfer it to each other."Iranian President Hassan Rouhani meanwhile acknowledged that the virus was in nearly all of Iran's 31 provinces while speaking at a Cabinet meeting Wednesday."This disease is a widespread one," he said, according to a transcript. "It encompasses almost all of our provinces and is, in a sense, a global disease that many countries in the world have become infected with, and we must work together to tackle this problem as quickly as possible."Meanwhile Wednesday, Saudi Arabia's Deputy Health Minister Abdel-Fattah Mashat was quoted on the state-linked news site Al-Yaum saying that groups of visitors to Mecca from inside the country would now also be barred from performing the pilgrimage, known as the umrah. The crowds typically are made up of foreign residents going as large groups. Individuals and families in the kingdom can still travel to Mecca.Saudi Arabia last week closed off the holiest sites in Islam to foreign pilgrims over the coronavirus, disrupting travel for thousands of Muslims already headed to the kingdom and potentially affecting plans later this year for millions more ahead of the fasting month of Ramadan and the annual hajj pilgrimage.
Seventy-seven people have died and 2,336 have been infected by the coronavirus, Iran's Deputy Health Minister Alireza Raisi said in an announcement on state TV on Tuesday.Iran has had the highest number of deaths from the coronavirus outside of China, where the virus originated.
Sixty six people have died and 1501 people have been infected by coronavirus in Iran, Deputy Health Minister Alireza Raisi said in an announcement on state TV."The definite latest numbers we have are 523 new infections and 12 new deaths so the total number of those infected is 1501 until now and the number of deaths is 66," he said.
Iran's health ministry raised on Sunday the nationwide death toll from the new coronavirus to 54 as the number of infected cases jumped overnight to 978 people.The ministry's spokesman Kianoush Jahanpour said new cases were confirmed in a number of cities, including Mashhad, which is home to Iran's most important Shiite shrine that attracts pilgrims from across the region. Calls by Iran's civilian government to clerics to close such shrines to to the public have not been uniformly followed. The shrine in Mashhad is among those that have remained open.The new figures represent 11 more deaths than reported on Saturday and a whopping 385 new cases of infections. The new numbers, however, bring down the percentage of deaths to infections from 20% to around 5.5%. Still, that is much higher than other countries, suggesting the number of infections may also be much higher.Jahanpour said in his daily briefing that the number of cases is "still inclining" across Iran.Also on Sunday, Iran's state broadcaster said all flights to the city of Rasht, the capital of nothern Gilan province, had been suspended. It gave no reasons why. The area of Gilan has some of Iran's highest number of infections after the capital, Tehran, and the holy city of Qom, the epicenter of the virus outbreak in the country.The illness, known as COVID-19 and that originated in central China, has infected at least seven government officials in Iran, including one of its vice presidents and a senior health ministry official.Iran has said it is preparing for the possibility of "tens of thousands" of people getting tested for the virus behind the outbreak.Of the more than 1,100 cases in the Middle East, the majority trace back to the Islamic Republic.The virus has infected more than 86,000 people worldwide and caused more than 2,900 deaths since emerging in China. Iran has the world's highest death toll outside of China.